Related Articles

Show All Topics

Making Friends in the Scientific Community

One often hears of conflict between religion and science or that creationists are anti-science. This article rejects such mindsets and presents another perspective about looking for the good even in people we may disagree with.

Read More

How Many Brains Do We Have?

New study of neuronal diversification reveals the complexity of the gut's brain

Read More

Dinosaurs and Dust

Climatic effects of the impact and volcanism scenarios for the extinction of dinosaurs are investigated in a modelling paper.

Read More

Darwin’s Cost

Species may undergo minor adaptation through Darwinian processes, but this comes at the cost of genetic deterioration.

Read More

“Silent” Substitutions Make a Difference

Changing a DNA sequence can affect a protein even if it does not change the amino acid sequence.

Read More

A Genomic Code for Chromosomal Structure

Chromosomes regulate their own structure through their sequences of non-protein-coding DNA.

Read More

Design in Crane Fly Eyes

Fossilized crane fly eyes discovered to be calcified and have melanin

Read More

Different Colors on Different Soils

The specific genes have been identified that cause a lizard to match the black rocks it lives on.

Read More

Caenorhabditis elegans as a Model to Understand the Role of Epigenetic Heritage in Microevolution

In recent decades, epigenetics has been shown to be a promising field of research, since it describes changes in inheritance patterns that do not involve DNA modifications and are related to interactions between the organism and the environment. Epigenetic marks are chemical changes that occur in chromosomes and result in the silencing or activation of specific genes in different tissues. It has been…

Read More

What Makes the Whole More Than the Sum of Its Parts?

A living being is more than the collection of the multitude of organic components of which it is made.

Read More

Some Things We Can Know

EDITORIAL. Those who study historical topics such as origins often face questions for which no easy answers are evident. Nevertheless, there are some things that can be known, and these should not be overlooked. Published in Origins, n. 65.

Read More

The Art of Making Omelets

A review of the book "Undeniable." Intelligent beings and their know- how are necessary to implement the highly improbable combination of steps that bring into existence functional things. Published in Origins, n. 65.

Read More

What Adventists Have to Share with the Scientific Community

Only if Christians can be trusted in areas scientists know, will they be trusted in areas scientists don’t know.

Read More

A Journey of Faith and Science

Toward the end of my graduate studies in organic chemistry at the University of California, Irvine, the conflict that sometimes arises between science and faith presented itself forcibly to me. The closest friend that I had in a group of about 25 people was a brilliant post-doctoral fellow from Georgia, and we decided to take a day trip to the San Diego Zoo to get away from the pressures of the University.…

Read More

DNA and Design

Imagine walking down the beach and coming across the words “Romeo loves Juliet” written in the sand. Most of us have experienced something like this and would not be surprised, but most people would be surprised to find the entire text of William Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet written in sand. Why is this? The obvious reason is that sand is the wrong material for large writing projects. Sand grains…

Read More

Creation Exhibit to Open at World Headquarters: Just in Time for Creation Sabbath

In preparation for Creation Sabbath on October 28, 2017, the Geoscience Research Institute (GRI) is creating a series of scientifically accurate and faith building displays. The exhibit will be opened during this year’s Autumn Council of the General Conference Executive Committee, held from October 5-11 at the world headquarters of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Silver Spring, Maryland. “The displays…

Read More

Would You Move to an Exoplanet?

If given the choice where in our Milky Way galaxy you would prefer to live, where would you go? To one of those newly-discovered extra-solar planets the media get enthusiastic about when water has been detected there?Before you answer these questions remember that, beyond the presence of water, many other conditions must be fulfilled before any planet can support the continued existence of life as-we-know-it,…

Read More

Organisms in Their Niche: Passive Modeling Clay or Problem-Solving Entities?

One person’s cultural background can bias their view about people from other cultures… even before they have ever met. Could people also have a bias about how they think about other creatures? It may even be possible that scientific culture could prejudice the way researchers see creature-environmental relations with the potential to bias whole research programs.

Read More

Microbes, Symbiosis, and the Lesson of Interdependence

A very common reaction to the thought of “microbes” is a compelling desire to slather up in hand sanitizer! However, it is seldom realized that the greatest majority of microorganisms are at the very least not harmful, and at the most necessary for human life! Many aspects of microbial interaction with our environment allow it to be so perfect for humans. Some of these aspects include oxygen generation,…

Read More

The Great Search

In a world drowning in information, there is an even stronger search for ultimate truth. It seems the information age expects each of us to sort out misleading advertisements, internet “facts”, and professionally perpetrated misinformation in our own attempts to determine what is true.

Read More